Cafe Sci Cambridge: Gut bacteria and human health

Using genomic tools to study gut microbiome will help us understand its role in health and disease.
Date: 
Wed 11th Sep,
7:00pm to 9:00pm

About 2% of a person’s body weight is due to the bacteria that live in our intestines. This so-called “gut microbiome” is an essential contributor to human health and imbalances in it can contribute to conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, allergies and obesity. In our September event, Hilary Browne from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Alexandre Almeida from the European Bioinformatics Institute will talk about the latest insights into the complex and fascinating connections between human health and our gut microbiome. Hilary works on sequencing the genomes of the microbes in the human gut, helping researchers develop better understanding of the processes at work. Alexandre’s research focuses on using computational approaches to study the gut microbiome, specifically looking at how interactions between microbes can affect human health.

Hilary Browne is a researcher at the Sanger Institute, best known for its role in the Human Genome Project. Hilary works on sequencing the genomes of the microbes in the human gut, which helps other researchers study their functions and characteristics, something that we currently don’t know enough about.

Alexandre Almeida’s research at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) is focused on using computational approaches to study the gut microbiome. He looks at how interactions between specific microbes can affect human health. Alex uses the latest genomic tools to discover and describe new species of gut bacteria, and determine which may play important roles in the incidence of disease.

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This is a free and non-ticketed event.
Doors open at 18:45 so arrive early to avoid disappointment.
Starts at 19:00 and finish around 20:30.